Art in the Community

On Saturday we held an Art in the Community event to finalise plans for the tiled street signs. Despite a very cold morning, we had a good turnout and a lively discussion. Residents had the opportunity to see sample tiles and discuss the format for installation. It was decided that residents would like to pursue the tiled street sign idea – there was discussion over whether it would be better to have black letters on a white background or white letters on a black background (both versions have been provided above). If anyone has an opinion one way or another please leave a comment below and join the conversation.

 

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2 Responses to Art in the Community

  1. Veronica & James says:

    Our household suggested and designed the Art choice of “Welcome Street Signs ” using traditional Victorian tiles. We are glad the feedback has been positive.
    However, being aware of our limited budget and practicalities of installing the design above, some amendments have been suggested if the work is going to installed well and not be damaged or stolen.

    ORIGINAL ART DESIGN
    A) The only way to do what we shown in original design would be to lay tiles flush in the wall- which is not possible in the locations. The design shows a 2 border height of tiles which is difficult to install on a tight budget for 8/9 road signs.
    The feedback from
    Craven Dunnill Jackfield Ltd, Encaustic & Decorative Tile Works,Jackfield Tile Museum, Ironbridge Gorge,Telford, in Shropshire where we are getting tiles is

    “For installation I think it will certainly need a frame (the mock ups indicate a black frame). Some of the street names I have seen done in this way are often set back into walls as opposed to sitting on the bricks. Local street names here tend to have a cast Iron surround which they are set in to. A wooden frame is probably going to deteriorate over time and may also be open for ‘easy access’ to get the tiles out of, so it would probably need to be something quite hardwearing and sturdy?

    OPTIONS suggested by residents after art meeting when considering installation and design.

    1) Keep to one line of tiles and remove yellow border but bring the idea of spraying a framework ‘tube colour’ yellow is a possible solution ( expensive ?) However, the yellow iron framework has no’ material link’ to the tube other than colour as it is the ‘yellow tiles’ that are the link. ”
    Suggest we keep to Black framework if possible.

    2) Using white lettering on black ( reverse suggested by resident ) is also a nice idea but much bolder and so the decorative tile has to be the right colour to cope. A solution would be a more graphic one colour decorative tile- but this means it is different from original design which residents liked. However this could look very good if we were happy to go for a less colourful design.

    POSSIBLE SOLUTION

    B) Putting 2 yellow tiles just at the BEGINNING & END of street name ( not border ) will allow for the tiles to be installed properly under a metal framework within our budget.

    Also it would look good with the reverse white lettering on black which many of us liked.

    What does everyone think? Ben can put an examples up that James has supplied and you can all feed back….

  2. JS says:

    The new ‘decorative nameplate’ proposal works thus:

    The yellow border becomes two bracketing tiles at either end. With a single encaustic ‘spacer’ tile between the two sets of characters. These can have a design appropriate to whichever solution we agree on – dark or light.

    Personally, in removing the encapsulating yellow frame, the darker tile option now looks more appealing.

    The securing frame should be powder-coated black.

    Overall, this solution will be cheaper, easier to install, and weigh less too.

    I think the spacer tile should only be used as such – it would be too busy to have them at either end. As well as diluting the aesthetic, and erasing the effect of a unity via a common approach to each (yellow ‘brackets’).

    – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

    It isn’t quite the right place, but as we are spending this time adding a sense of visual style and ‘up market’ branding to our neighbourhood, it REALLY saddens me when I walk by the new Langham Road table and see (what I am terming) ‘the finger’ – this a very ugly sliver of black tarmac, which extends in line with the roadway, from the table to a new drain cover.

    Such scarring of the road surface will never blend in. And it simply defies logic (as well as countering all the efforts to improve the aesthetic of our area) to not lay a kerb-to-kerb broad band of tarmac to neaten the road surface. So we get a new table, and another addition to the chaotic road surface. Disappointing. Ugly. And somewhat demoralising.

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